PLANT SLANT FARE: For ‘a healthier you’!

plantslantfare2

A PLANT SLANT DIET – For ‘a healthier you’

I made the decision to adapt a ‘plant slant’ diet for a number of reasons. There are many health benefits to be gained by making the transition, as well as other benefits for the planet.

Making the transition to a ‘plant slant’ diet can be daunting. Many people worry about getting enough protein if they go ‘plant slant’.  This is not true.  Watch Do Vegetarians Get Enough Protein by Dr. Michael Gregor’s – https://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-vegetarians-get-enough-protein/.

If you are shopping and cooking for one, like I am for most meals; efficiency and cost savings are key while maintaining a healthy diet in the midst of a busy lifestyle. Where possible I use fresh and organic ingredients.  Next best category is pesticide free. I using muscle response testing to ensure that products are safe. On a recent shopping trip to a well known health food store, of three different organic sweet potatoes, only one was actually safe for me. I teach my clients how to use muscle response testing for health protection.

WHAT’S IN MY SHOPPING CART? How Do I Use It?

Breakfast options:

Apples (lots of apples) or other fruit that is in season or frozen (I buy frozen berries and thaw the bag and refrigerate it) with ground flax seed, ground chia seeds, hemp seeds and walnuts. Black tea.

Berries Flax Chia Hemp Walnuts

Two organic eggs lightly fried in avocado oil on authentic sourdough rye toast (no butter) with fruit on the side (sliced apple or small bowl of berries/fruit).

Avocado oil Sourdough

 

 

 

 

 

Lunch options:

Vegetable ‘stoup’ (homemade). According to the Urban Dictionary, stoup is a simmered or slow cooked dish that is neither stew nor soup in consistency but somewhere in between. I make very large batches of these stoups and freeze them in wide mouth 250 ml glass jars.  One makes a healthy lunch for me as I pour it into a soup mug over a handful of shredded greens, add a spoonful of horseradish and pinch of organic Herbamare (sea salt, celery, leek, cress, onion, chives, parsley, lovage, garlic, basil, marjoram, rosemary, thyme, kelp). Many older people who live alone do not eat as healthy as they could. Having these jars of nutritious stoup in the freezer helps meet their nutrition needs.  I often share my jars with people who are in need of a nutritious boost. Making big batches of stoup can be a labour of love or therapeutic.  I call it ‘soup therapy’ as it helps during times of feeling anxious or helpless about situations.

Stoup  Horseradish Herbamere

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Tomato vegetable black bean stoup that has onions, organic celery, organic garlic, parsnips, organic sweet potato, organic carrots, organic kale, organic fire roasted tomatoes, organic vegetable bouillon cubes, organic black beans. This also doubles as a chili base that you can add some heat (spices) to.
  • Red lentil vegetable stoup using the same vegetables (except tomatoes) as above and one whole package of organic red lentils.

Salad with vegetables (fresh, pickled beets), beans, pumpkin seeds, feta cheese with dressing (organic olive oil, apple cider vinegar with maple syrup or black currant spread or with grainy mustard and honey)

Grilled sourdough rye vegetable sandwich with picked fire roasted red pepper, red onion, spinach/super greens and cheese.

Pizza made with multigrain flatbread (no preservatives or additives) with sundried tomato pesto or basil pesto, red onion, shredded greens (arugula, spinach, super greens), feta and mozzarella.

Pesto Arugula

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quinoa, black bean (or chick pea), sweet potato salad with green onions, red peppers, shredded super greens with homemade dressing (organic olive oil mix).

Sourdough rye sandwich with leftover baked wild caught sole or haddock topped with basil pesto (see below) and greens.

Dinner options:

Wild caught sole or haddock topped with basil pesto and baked with sweet potato.

Wild sole  Pesto2

Omelet with onion, sundried tomato and spinach.

Pizza made with multigrain flatbread (no preservatives or additives) with sundried tomato pesto or basil pesto, red onion, shredded greens (arugula, spinach, super greens), feta and mozzarella.

Salad with vegetables (fresh, pickled beets), pumpkin seeds, feta cheese with dressing (olive oil mix)

Red lentil curry with coconut milk and lime served on organic quinoa (cooked with organic vegetable boullion).

Red lentils quinoa

Pasta (100% red lentil, chick pea – no wheat) with homemade tomato sauce or pesto and shredded greens.

Red lentil noodles

Sprouted quinoa chia, chickpea sweet potato or spicy black bean burger with super greens, red onion, cheese on a multi grain thin bun (no preservatives or additives) or a side of salad/vegetables.

Sol burgers  Multigrain Thins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other vegetarian stews, casseroles. I am always experimenting.  You can find some  interesting recipes on the Blue Zones website.

Stoup over shredded greens with horseradish.

Green drink:

Celery, spinach or arugula or super greens, pineapple (or pure juice) and organic pumpkin seed butter plus filtered natural spring water.

Snacks:

Apple slices with organic peanut butter, hazelnut butter or pumpkin seed butter.

Celery (other veggies) with hummus.

Necessary

If you adapt a plant slant diet you may need to add B12 supplements. Vitamin B12 is Necessary for Arterial Health – https://nutritionfacts.org/video/vitamin-b12-necessary-for-arterial-health/. Spirulina and blue green algae – interfere with B12.  Eat sea vegetables on days you do not take B12 supplements. Check to make sure your ‘greens’ or protein mixes do not contain sea vegetables if you are taking B12 supplements on the same day.

Elisabeth Hines, C.N.C., C.B.P., Holistic Wellness Practitioner, www.mybodycanhealitself.ca

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